Groenekennis

  • externe gebruiker (Let opwarning)
  • Log in as
Record nummer 2245216
Titel Effect of reducing dietary crude protein in hog finisher barrows and gilts on technical performance
toon extra info.
Patricia Pluk, Marinus van Krimpen
Auteur(s) Pluk, Patricia ; Krimpen, Marinus van
Uitgever Wageningen : Wageningen Livestock Research
Jaar van uitgave 2018
Pagina's 1 online resource (PDF, 45 pages) illustrations
Titel van reeks Wageningen Livestock Research rapport (1111)
Annotatie(s) Project number BO-31.03-005-001
Online full text
Publicatie type Boek
Taal Engels
Toelichting (Engels) The objective of this study was to determine the effect of reducing dietary crude protein (CP) levels in hog finisher barrows and gilts on animal performance. Diets were formulated to meet the requirements of the first six essential amino acids. It was hypothesised that lowest dietary CP levels without negative effects on technical performance would be close to treatments D (barrows) and J (gilts). From those CP level onwards, isoleucine (and histidine) likely became limiting factors.The most important conclusions are mentioned below. Performance30-55 kg BW:- The response to CP level was different in barrows compared to gilts (P interaction<0.05). In barrows, best performance was obtained at a CP level of 14.5% whereas gilts performed best at 15.5% CP. These CP levels also resulted in lowest cost per kg gain for barrows and gilts respectively.- Broken-line analysis indicated a minimum CP level of 14.7% and 15.1% for barrows and gilts respectively. This is in line with literature. Based on the diet composition in the current trial, soybean meal inclusion at this CP level would be approximately 12.5% and its inclusion could thus be reduced by 36%.55-80 kg BW:- No interactions were found between CP level and sex (P interaction>0.05).- A quadratic response to CP level was observed for ADG and efficiency (both P<0.05), but not for ADFI. ADG and efficiency were highest in animals receiving 13.9% CP or more.- Barrows had a higher ADFI and ADG (both P<0.001), but were not less efficient compared to gilts (P=0.87).- Broken-line analysis indicated a minimum CP level of 14.4% for both barrows and gilts. This is partially in line with literature as levels of 11% and 11.9% have been reported to nog negatively affect ADG. However, bodyweight ranges were higher (up to 100 kg). Based on the diet composition in the current trial, soybean meal inclusion at this CP level would be approximately 9.5% and its inclusion could thus be reduced by 32%. 80-115 kg BW:- No interactions occurred were found between CP level and sex (P interaction>0.05).- Performance increased with increasing CP level and cost per kg gain decreased with increasing CP level (all P linear<0.001).- Barrows had a higher ADFI and ADG, but were less efficient compared to gilts (all P<0.001).- Broken-line analysis indicated a minimum CP level of 11.7% for barrows. Based on the diet composition in the current trial, soybean meal inclusion at this CP level would be approximately 4.5% and its inclusion could thus be reduced by 55%.- Broken-line for gilts resulted in high standard error with large confidence intervals and were thus not used for interpretation.Carcass- Differences in carcass characteristics between treatments occurred, independent of sex (P interaction>0.05). Quadratic responses were observed for final bodyweight, slaughter weight and carcass weight (all P<0.001). Animals receiving the four treatments with highest CP levels had similar weights while the animals with lowest CP level were significantly lighter.- Quadratic responses for loin depth and lean meat percentage were observed (both P quadratic=0.04). However, expressed as a percentage of slaughter weight these responses were not observed anymore (resp. P quadratic= 0.54 and 0.16).- Barrows were significantly heavier at the end of the trial (P<0.001). Expressed, as a percentage of slaughter weight, barrows had higher backfat but lower loin depth and lean meat compared to gilts (all P<0.01). Carbon Footprint- Dietary Carbon Footprint (CFP) increased with decreasing dietary CP level. This was due to the increase in synthetic amino acid inclusion in the formulations and its high impact on Carbon Footprint.- Animals receiving the low CP diets were more efficient converting this to gain compared to animals receiving high CP diets.- The assessment on overall CFP could not be made as the tool is not able to adjust to actual performance and a three phase feeding program.
Reacties
Er zijn nog geen reacties. U kunt de eerste schrijven!
Schrijf een reactie
 

To support researchers to publish their research Open Access, deals have been negotiated with various publishers. Depending on the deal, a discount is provided for the author on the Article Processing Charges that need to be paid by the author to publish an article Open Access. A discount of 100% means that (after approval) the author does not have to pay Article Processing Charges.

For the approval of an Open Access deal for an article, the corresponding author of this article must be affiliated with Wageningen University & Research.

U moet eerst inloggen om gebruik te maken van deze service. Login als Wageningen University & Research user of guest user rechtsboven op deze pagina.