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Science

American Association for the Advancement of Science

1880-

ISSN: 0036-8075 (1095-9203)
Multidisciplinary Sciences - Multidisciplinary - Multidisciplinary
APC costs unknown

Recent articles

1 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Ultrafast isomerization of retinal is the primary step in photoresponsive biological functions including vision in humans and ion transport across bacterial membranes. We used an x-ray laser to study the subpicosecond structural dynamics of retinal isomerization in the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. A series of structural snapshots with near-atomic spatial resolution and temporal resolution in the femtosecond regime show how the excited all-trans retinal samples conformational states within the protein binding pocket before passing through a twisted geometry and emerging in the 13-cis conformation. Our findings suggest ultrafast collective motions of aspartic acid residues and functional water molecules in the proximity of the retinal Schiff base as a key facet of this stereoselective and efficient photochemical reaction.
2 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Moro-Martin A.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/111?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 111 111
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
3 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00

Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/112?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 112 114
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
4 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Clery D.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/115?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 115 116
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
5 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Normile D.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/116?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 116 117
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
6 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Zainzinger V.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/117?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 117 117
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
7 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Cohen J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/118?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 118 118
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
8 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Pennisi, E ; Price ; M.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/119?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 119 119
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
9 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Service R. F.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/120?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 120 123
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
10 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Brosnan S. F.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/124?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 124 125
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
11 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Nagy L. G.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/125?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 125 126
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
12 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Moffat K.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/127?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 127 128
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
13 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Zielinska, A. P ; Schuh ; M.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/128?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 128 129
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
14 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Cotton, J. A ; Berriman ; M ; Dalen ; L ; Barnes ; I.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/130?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 130 131
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
15 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Li, W ; Ji ; L.-J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/132?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 132 132
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
16 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Nissen P.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/133?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 133 133
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
17 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Guerrini, C. J ; Majumder ; M. A ; Lewellyn ; M. J ; McGuire ; A. L.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/134?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 134 136
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
18 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Winfree R.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/137?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 137 137
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
19 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Uzzi B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/138?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 138 138
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
20 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Brito, M. F. G ; Magalhaes ; A. L. B ; Lima-Junior ; D. P ; Pelicice ; F. M ; Azevedo-Santos ; V. M ; Garcia ; D. A. Z ; Cunico ; A. M ; Vitule ; J. R. S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/139-a?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 139 139
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
21 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Buchanan, G. M ; Beresford ; A. E ; Hebblewhite ; M ; Escobedo ; F. J ; De Klerk ; H. M ; Donald ; P. F ; Escribano ; P ; Koh ; L. P ; Martinez-Lopez ; J ; Pettorelli ; N ; Skidmore ; A. K ; Szantoi ; Z ; Tabor ; K ; Wegmann ; M ; Wich ; S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/139-b?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 139 140
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
22 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Iversen, L. L ; Bendixen ; M.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/140?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 140 140
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
23 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Hines P. J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-a?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 141
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
24 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Osborne I. S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-b?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 141
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
25 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Grocholski B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-c?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 141
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
26 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Smith H. J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-d?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 141
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
27 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Vignieri S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-e?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 142
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
28 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Hurtley S. M.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-f?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 142
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
29 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Charneski C. A.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-g?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 142
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
30 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Wong W.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-h?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 142
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
31 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Hines P. J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-i?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp i 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
32 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Smith K. T.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-j?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
33 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Ray L. B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-k?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
34 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Grocholski B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-l?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
35 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Yeston J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-m?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
36 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Smith H. J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-n?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
37 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Alderton G.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-o?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
38 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Benson P. J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-p?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
39 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Balasubramani A.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-q?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
40 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Funk M. A.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/141-r?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 141 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
41 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Ash C.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/142-a?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 142 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
42 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Kiberstis P. A.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/142-b?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 142 142
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
43 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Alderton G.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/142-c?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 142 142
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
44 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Osborne I. S.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/142-d?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 142 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
45 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Ray L. B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/142-e?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 142 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
46 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Smith H. J.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/142-f?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 142 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
47 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Grocholski B.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/142-g?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 142 143
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
48 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
A high-energy neutrino event detected by IceCube on 22 September 2017 was coincident in direction and time with a gamma-ray flare from the blazar TXS 0506+056. Prompted by this association, we investigated 9.5 years of IceCube neutrino observations to search for excess emission at the position of the blazar. We found an excess of high-energy neutrino events, with respect to atmospheric backgrounds, at that position between September 2014 and March 2015. Allowing for time-variable flux, this constitutes 3.5 evidence for neutrino emission from the direction of TXS 0506+056, independent of and prior to the 2017 flaring episode. This suggests that blazars are identifiable sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrino flux.
49 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Inorganic perovskite ferroelectrics are widely used in nonvolatile memory elements, capacitors, and sensors because of their excellent ferroelectric and other properties. Organic ferroelectrics are desirable for their mechanical flexibility, low weight, environmentally friendly processing, and low processing temperatures. Although almost a century has passed since the first ferroelectric, Rochelle salt, was discovered, examples of highly desirable organic perovskite ferroelectrics are lacking. We found a family of metal-free organic perovskite ferroelectrics with the characteristic three-dimensional structure, among which MDABCO (N-methyl-N'-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octonium)–ammonium triiodide has a spontaneous polarization of 22 microcoulombs per square centimeter [close to that of barium titanate (BTO)], a high phase transition temperature of 448 kelvins (above that of BTO), and eight possible polarization directions. These attributes make it attractive for use in flexible devices, soft robotics, biomedical devices, and other applications.
50 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
A common theme in the self-organization of multicellular tissues is the use of cell-cell signaling networks to induce morphological changes. We used the modular synNotch juxtacrine signaling platform to engineer artificial genetic programs in which specific cell-cell contacts induced changes in cadherin cell adhesion. Despite their simplicity, these minimal intercellular programs were sufficient to yield assemblies with hallmarks of natural developmental systems: robust self-organization into multidomain structures, well-choreographed sequential assembly, cell type divergence, symmetry breaking, and the capacity for regeneration upon injury. The ability of these networks to drive complex structure formation illustrates the power of interlinking cell signaling with cell sorting: Signal-induced spatial reorganization alters the local signals received by each cell, resulting in iterative cycles of cell fate branching. These results provide insights into the evolution of multicellularity and demonstrate the potential to engineer customized self-organizing tissues or materials.
51 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Understanding magnetic phases in quantum mechanical systems is one of the essential goals in condensed matter physics, and the advent of prototype quantum simulation hardware has provided new tools for experimentally probing such systems. We report on the experimental realization of a quantum simulation of interacting Ising spins on three-dimensional cubic lattices up to dimensions 8 x 8 x 8 on a D-Wave processor (D-Wave Systems, Burnaby, Canada). The ability to control and read out the state of individual spins provides direct access to several order parameters, which we used to determine the lattice’s magnetic phases as well as critical disorder and one of its universal exponents. By tuning the degree of disorder and effective transverse magnetic field, we observed phase transitions between a paramagnetic, an antiferromagnetic, and a spin-glass phase.
52 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Surveillance of clandestine nuclear tests relies on a global seismic network, but the potential of spaceborne monitoring has been underexploited. We used satellite radar imagery to determine the complete surface displacement field of up to 3.5 meters of divergent horizontal motion with 0.5 meters of subsidence associated with North Korea’s largest underground nuclear test. Combining insight from geodetic and seismological remote sensing, we found that the aftermath of the initial explosive deformation involved subsidence associated with subsurface collapse and aseismic compaction of the damaged rocks of the test site. The explosive yield from the nuclear detonation with best-fitting source parameters for 450-meter depth was 191 kilotonnes of TNT equivalent. Our results demonstrate the capability of spaceborne remote sensing to help characterize large underground nuclear tests.
53 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Deconstructive functionalizations involving scission of carbon-carbon double bonds are well established. In contrast, unstrained C(sp3)–C(sp3) bond cleavage and functionalization have less precedent. Here we report the use of deconstructive fluorination to access mono- and difluorinated amine derivatives by C(sp3)–C(sp3) bond cleavage in saturated nitrogen heterocycles such as piperidines and pyrrolidines. Silver-mediated ring-opening fluorination using Selectfluor highlights a strategy for cyclic amine functionalization and late-stage skeletal diversification, establishing cyclic amines as synthons for amino alkyl radicals and providing synthetic routes to valuable building blocks.
54 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Rising oceanic and atmospheric oxygen levels through time have been crucial to enhanced habitability of surface Earth environments. Few redox proxies can track secular variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations around threshold levels for metazoan survival in the upper ocean. We present an extensive compilation of iodine-to-calcium ratios (I/Ca) in marine carbonates. Our record supports a major rise in the partial pressure of oxygen in the atmosphere at ~400 million years (Ma) ago and reveals a step change in the oxygenation of the upper ocean to relatively sustainable near-modern conditions at ~200 Ma ago. An Earth system model demonstrates that a shift in organic matter remineralization to greater depths, which may have been due to increasing size and biomineralization of eukaryotic plankton, likely drove the I/Ca signals at ~200 Ma ago.
55 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Sunk costs are irrecoverable investments that should not influence decisions, because decisions should be made on the basis of expected future consequences. Both human and nonhuman animals can show sensitivity to sunk costs, but reports from across species are inconsistent. In a temporal context, a sensitivity to sunk costs arises when an individual resists ending an activity, even if it seems unproductive, because of the time already invested. In two parallel foraging tasks that we designed, we found that mice, rats, and humans show similar sensitivities to sunk costs in their decision-making. Unexpectedly, sensitivity to time invested accrued only after an initial decision had been made. These findings suggest that sensitivity to temporal sunk costs lies in a vulnerability distinct from deliberation processes and that this distinction is present across species.
56 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Most plants do poorly when flooded. Certain rice varieties, known as deepwater rice, survive periodic flooding and consequent oxygen deficiency by activating internode growth of stems to keep above the water. Here, we identify the gibberellin biosynthesis gene, SD1 (SEMIDWARF1), whose loss-of-function allele catapulted the rice Green Revolution, as being responsible for submergence-induced internode elongation. When submerged, plants carrying the deepwater rice–specific SD1 haplotype amplify a signaling relay in which the SD1 gene is transcriptionally activated by an ethylene-responsive transcription factor, OsEIL1a. The SD1 protein directs increased synthesis of gibberellins, largely GA4, which promote internode elongation. Evolutionary analysis shows that the deepwater rice–specific haplotype was derived from standing variation in wild rice and selected for deepwater rice cultivation in Bangladesh.
57 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Methane emissions from the U.S. oil and natural gas supply chain were estimated by using ground-based, facility-scale measurements and validated with aircraft observations in areas accounting for ~30% of U.S. gas production. When scaled up nationally, our facility-based estimate of 2015 supply chain emissions is 13 ± 2 teragrams per year, equivalent to 2.3% of gross U.S. gas production. This value is ~60% higher than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency inventory estimate, likely because existing inventory methods miss emissions released during abnormal operating conditions. Methane emissions of this magnitude, per unit of natural gas consumed, produce radiative forcing over a 20-year time horizon comparable to the CO2 from natural gas combustion. Substantial emission reductions are feasible through rapid detection of the root causes of high emissions and deployment of less failure-prone systems.
58 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
At the beginning of mammalian life, the genetic material from each parent meets when the fertilized egg divides. It was previously thought that a single microtubule spindle is responsible for spatially combining the two genomes and then segregating them to create the two-cell embryo. We used light-sheet microscopy to show that two bipolar spindles form in the zygote and then independently congress the maternal and paternal genomes. These two spindles aligned their poles before anaphase but kept the parental genomes apart during the first cleavage. This spindle assembly mechanism provides a potential rationale for erroneous divisions into more than two blastomeric nuclei observed in mammalian zygotes and reveals the mechanism behind the observation that parental genomes occupy separate nuclear compartments in the two-cell embryo.
59 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00

Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/194?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 194 194
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
60 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Authors: Evans T.
Article URL: http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/361/6398/198?rss=1
Citation: Vol 361 No. 6398 (2018) pp 198 198
Publication Date: 2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Journal: Science
61 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Sabo et al. (Research Articles, 8 December 2017, p. 1270) use sophisticated analyses of flow and fishery data from the Lower Mekong Basin to design a "good" hydrograph that, if implemented by planned hydropower dams, would increase the catch by a factor of 3.7. However, the hydrograph is not implementable, and, if it were, it would devastate the fishery. Further, the analyses are questionable.
62 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Previous detections of individual astrophysical sources of neutrinos are limited to the Sun and the supernova 1987A, whereas the origins of the diffuse flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos remain unidentified. On 22 September 2017, we detected a high-energy neutrino, IceCube-170922A, with an energy of ~290 tera–electron volts. Its arrival direction was consistent with the location of a known -ray blazar, TXS 0506+056, observed to be in a flaring state. An extensive multiwavelength campaign followed, ranging from radio frequencies to -rays. These observations characterize the variability and energetics of the blazar and include the detection of TXS 0506+056 in very-high-energy -rays. This observation of a neutrino in spatial coincidence with a -ray–emitting blazar during an active phase suggests that blazars may be a source of high-energy neutrinos.
63 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
Sabo et al. presented an empirically derived algorithm defining the socioecological response of the Tonle Sap Dai fishery in the Cambodian Mekong to basin-scale variation in hydrologic flow regime. Williams suggests that the analysis leading to the algorithm is flawed because of the large distance between the gauge used to measure water levels (hydrology) and the site of harvest for the fishery. Halls and Moyle argue that Sabo et al.’s findings are well known and contend that the algorithm is not a comprehensive assessment of sustainability. We argue that Williams’ critique stems from a misunderstanding about our analysis; further clarification of the analysis is provided. We regret not citing more of the work indicated by Halls and Moyle, yet we note that our empirical analysis provides additional new insights into Mekong flow-fishery relationships.
64 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
The root nodule symbiosis of plants with nitrogen-fixing bacteria affects global nitrogen cycles and food production but is restricted to a subset of genera within a single clade of flowering plants. To explore the genetic basis for this scattered occurrence, we sequenced the genomes of 10 plant species covering the diversity of nodule morphotypes, bacterial symbionts, and infection strategies. In a genome-wide comparative analysis of a total of 37 plant species, we discovered signatures of multiple independent loss-of-function events in the indispensable symbiotic regulator NODULE INCEPTION in 10 of 13 genomes of nonnodulating species within this clade. The discovery that multiple independent losses shaped the present-day distribution of nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiosis in plants reveals a phylogenetically wider distribution in evolutionary history and a so-far-underestimated selection pressure against this symbiosis.
65 show abstract
2018-07-12T10:39:11-07:00
The designer flow regime proposed by Sabo et al. (Research Articles, 8 December 2017, p. 1270) to support fisheries in the Lower Mekong Basin fails to account for important ecological, political, and economic dimensions. In doing so, they indicate that dam impacts can be easily mitigated. Such an action would serve to increase risks to food and livelihood futures in the basin.

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Impact

Journal Citation Reports (2016)

Impact factor: 37.205
Q1 (Multidisciplinary Sciences (2/64))

Scopus Journal Metrics (2016)

SJR: 13.535
SNIP: 7.688
Impact (Scopus CiteScore): 1.439
Quartile: Q1
CiteScore percentile: 99%
CiteScore rank: 1 out of 77
Cited by WUR staff: 6112 times. (2014-2016)

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