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    About

Psychological Bulletin

APA

1904-

ISSN: 0033-2909 (1939-1455)
Psychology - General Psychology - General Psychology
APC costs unknown

Recent articles

1 show abstract
0033-2909 * * 30441946
Gender differences in spatial aptitude are well established by adulthood, particularly when measured by tasks that require the mental rotation of objects (Linn & Petersen, 1985; Voyer, Voyer, & Bryden, 1995). Although the male advantage in mental rotation performance represents one of the most robust gender differences in adult cognition, the developmental trajectory of this male advantage remains a topic of considerable debate. To address this debate, we meta-analyzed 303 effect sizes pertaining to gender differences in mental rotation performance among 30,613 children and adolescents. We found significant developmental change in the magnitude of the gender difference: A small male advantage in mental rotation performance first emerged during childhood and then subsequently increased with age, reaching a moderate effect size during adolescence. Procedural factors, including task and stimulus characteristics, also accounted for variability in reported gender differences, even when controlling for the effect of age. These results demonstrate that both age and procedural characteristics moderate the magnitude of the gender difference in mental rotation throughout development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
2 show abstract
0033-2909 * * 30441947
Everyday life is defined by goal states that are continuously reprioritized based on available, often affective information. To pursue these goals, individuals need to process and maintain goal-relevant information, while ignoring potentially salient information that distracts resources from these goals. Empirically, this ability has typically been operationalized as working memory (WM) capacity. A growing body of research is investigating the impact of information’s affective salience on WM capacity. In the present review we address this question by exploring the potential differential impact of affective compared with neutral information on WM, and the underlying neural substrates. One-hundred and 65 studies (N = 7,433) were included in the meta-analysis. Results showed negligible to small (d̂ = −.07–.20) effects of affective information on behavioral measures of WM in healthy individuals (n = 4,936) that varied as a function of valence and task-relevance. Heterogeneity analyses were significant, demonstrating the need to identify further study-specific factors and individual differences that moderate affective WM. At the neural level (33 studies; n = 683), processing affective versus neutral material during WM tasks was associated with more frequent recruitment of the vlPFC, the amygdala, and the temporo-occipital cortex. In contrast to healthy individuals, across behavioral studies those suffering from mental health problems (n = 2,041) showed impaired WM accuracy (d̂ = −0.21) in the presence of affective material. These findings highlight the importance of integrating behavioral and neural levels of analysis. Finally, these findings suggest that affective WM capacity may be a transdiagnostic mechanism associated with poor mental health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
3 show abstract
0033-2909 * * 30441948
The facial feedback hypothesis suggests that an individual’s experience of emotion is influenced by feedback from their facial movements. To evaluate the cumulative evidence for this hypothesis, we conducted a meta-analysis on 286 effect sizes derived from 138 studies that manipulated facial feedback and collected emotion self-reports. Using random effects meta-regression with robust variance estimates, we found that the overall effect of facial feedback was significant but small. Results also indicated that feedback effects are stronger in some circumstances than others. We examined 12 potential moderators, and 3 were associated with differences in effect sizes: (a) Type of emotional outcome: Facial feedback influenced emotional experience (e.g., reported amusement) and, to a greater degree, affective judgments of a stimulus (e.g., the objective funniness of a cartoon). Three publication bias detection methods did not reveal evidence of publication bias in studies examining the effects of facial feedback on emotional experience, but all 3 methods revealed evidence of publication bias in studies examining affective judgments. (b) Presence of emotional stimuli: Facial feedback effects on emotional experience were larger in the absence of emotionally evocative stimuli (e.g., cartoons). (c) Type of stimuli: When participants were presented with emotionally evocative stimuli, facial feedback effects were larger in the presence of some types of stimuli (e.g., emotional sentences) than others (e.g., pictures). The available evidence supports the facial feedback hypothesis’ central claim that facial feedback influences emotional experience, although these effects tend to be small and heterogeneous. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)

Green Open Access

Sherpa/Romeo info

Author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing)
Author cannot archive publisher's version/PDF
  • Authors' pre-print on any website
  • Authors' pre-print must be labeled with date and accompanied with statement that paper has not (yet) been published
  • Authors' post-print on author's web-site, employers server, academic social networks, Academia.edu, ResearchGate, Mendeley or institutional repository, after acceptance
  • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
  • Must link to publisher version with DOI
  • Set statement must accompany deposit
  • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
  • APA will submit NIH author articles to PubMed Central, after author completion of form
  • Publisher last reviewed on 02/10/2017


More Sherpa/Romeo information

APC Discount

For this journal no deals have been made concerning APC discount

More information on Open Access publishing

Impact

Journal Citation Reports (2017)

Impact factor: 13.250
Q1 (Psychology (3/78))

Scopus Journal Metrics (2017)

SJR: 8.793
SNIP: 8.217
Impact (Scopus CiteScore): 1.624
Quartile: Q1
CiteScore percentile: 98%
CiteScore rank: 3 out of 189
Cited by WUR staff: 172 times. (2014-2016)

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