Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 306701
Title Effect of maize canopy and water repellency on moisture patterns in a Dutch black plaggen soil
Author(s) Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.
Source Plant and Soil 195 (1997)2. - ISSN 0032-079X - p. 339 - 350.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1004262113061
Department(s) Winand Staring Centre for Integrated Land, Soil and Water Research
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 1997
Abstract Man-made raised sandy soils in the Netherlands are classified as `brown' or `black' plaggen soils. When dry, the brown soils are wettable, but the black soils are water repellent. For one growing season, transects were sampled in a maize cropped black plaggen soil at the Heino experimental farm. Due to interception and stemflow, water was concentrated near the roots of the maize. Between the maize rows, higher soil water contents were found in microdepressions, due to rainwater dripping to the ground from overhanging leaves. Redistribution of soil water from wet to dry areas was restricted by the water repellency of the dry sand. As a consequence, there was a distinct variation in soil moisture content. These irregular wetting patterns did not induce preferential downward flow, but widened over time; because the dry, water repellent subsoil impeded and resisted infiltration into the deeper subsoil.
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