Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 325448
Title The contribution of biotic and abiotic processes during azo dye reduction in anaerobic sludge
Author(s) Zee, F.P. van der; Bisschops, I.A.E.; Blanchard, V.G.; Bouwman, R.H.M.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.
Source Water Research 37 (2003)13. - ISSN 0043-1354 - p. 3098 - 3109.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/S0043-1354(03)00166-0
Department(s) Sub-department of Environmental Technology
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2003
Keyword(s) rioolafvalwater - anaërobe behandeling - azoverbindingen - kleurstoffen (dyes) - redoxreacties - afvalwaterbehandeling - sewage effluent - anaerobic treatment - azo compounds - dyes - redox reactions - waste water treatment - redox mediators - decolorization - bacteria - system
Categories Waste Water Treatment
Abstract Azo dye reduction results from a combination of biotic and abiotic processes during the anaerobic treatment of dye containing effluents. Biotic processes are due to enzymatic reactions whereas the chemical reaction is due to sulfide. In this research, the relative impact of the different azo dye reduction mechanisms was determined by investigating the reduction of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and Reactive Red 2 (RR2) under different conditions. Reduction rates of two azo dyes were compared in batch assays over a range of sulphide concentrations in the presence of living or inactivated anaerobic granular sludge
Azo dye reduction results from a combination of biotic and abiotic processes during the anaerobic treatment of dye containing effluents. Biotic processes are due to enzymatic reactions whereas the chemical reaction is due to sulfide. In this research, the relative impact of the different azo dye reduction mechanisms was determined by investigating the reduction of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and Reactive Red 2 (RR2) under different conditions. Reduction rates of two azo dyes were compared in batch assays over a range of sulphide concentrations in the presence of living or inactivated anaerobic granular sludge. Biological dye reduction followed zero order kinetics and chemical dye reduction followed second-order rate kinetics as a function of sulfide and dye concentration. Chemical reduction of the dyes was greatly stimulated in the presence of autoclaved sludge; whereas chemical dye reduction was not affected by living or gamma-irradiated-sludge. Presumably redox-mediating enzyme cofactors released by cell lysis contributed to the stimulatory effect. This hypothesis was confirmed in assays evaluating the chemical reduction of AO7 utilizing riboflavin, representative of the heat stable redox-mediating moieties of common occurring flavin enzyme cofactors. Sulfate influenced dye reduction in accordance to biogenic sulfide formation from sulfate reduction. In assays lacking sulfur compounds, dye reduction only readily occurred in the presence of living granular sludge, demonstrating the importance of enzymatic mechanisms. Both chemical and biological mechanisms of dye reduction were greatly stimulated by the addition of the redox-mediating compound, anthraquinone-disulfonate. Based on an analysis of the kinetics and demonstration in lab-scale upward-flow anaerobic sludge bed reactors, the relative importance of chemical dye reduction mechanisms in high rate anaerobic bioreactors was shown to be small due to the high biomass levels in the reactors. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
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