Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 334348
Title Modelling maximum adsorption capacities of soot and soot-like materials for PAHs and PCBs
Author(s) Noort, P.C.M. van; Jonker, M.T.O.; Koelmans, A.A.
Source Environmental Science and Technology 38 (2004)12. - ISSN 0013-936X - p. 3305 - 3309.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1021/es035120w
Department(s) Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2004
Keyword(s) aromatische koolwaterstoffen - polycyclische koolwaterstoffen - adsorptie - sorbaten - hydrofobiciteit - organische verbindingen - monitoring - waterkwaliteit - waterbodems - aromatic hydrocarbons - polycyclic hydrocarbons - adsorption - sorbates - hydrophobicity - organic compounds - water quality - water bottoms - polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons - hydrophobic organic-chemicals - partition-coefficients - aqueous solubilities - black carbon - sorption - water - sediment - extraction - biphenyls
Categories Water Quality
Abstract Recent studies have shown that not partitioning but adsorption is the main mechanism for sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds to soot and soot-like materials. For compounds that adsorb by van der Waals forces only, variation in soot-water distribution coefficients will result from differences in these forces for adsorption, as well as the maximum number of accessible sites. This maximum number of accessible sites may a priori be expected to vary due to differences in both sorbent characteristics and sorbate dimensions. In this modeling study, variation in maximum adsorption capacities is explained from sorbent and sorbate properties. Maximum adsorption capacities were calculated using (a) literature values for soot-water distribution coefficients for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycholorobiphenyls on 10 different soot and soot-like materials and (b) Langmuir affinities for adsorption at a carbonaceous surface estimated using a recently reported method
Recent studies have shown that not partitioning but adsorption is the main mechanism for sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds to soot and soot-like materials. For compounds that adsorb by van der Waals forces only, variation in soot-water distribution coefficients will result from differences in these forces for adsorption, as well as the maximum number of accessible sites. This maximum number of accessible sites may a priori be expected to vary due to differences in both sorbent characteristics and sorbate dimensions. In this modeling study, variation in maximum adsorption capacities is explained from sorbent and sorbate properties. Maximum adsorption capacities were calculated using (a) literature values for soot-water distribution coefficients for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorobiphenyls on 10 different soot and soot-like materials and (b) Langmuir affinities for adsorption at a carbonaceous surface estimated using a recently reported method. The variation in maximum adsorption capacities could be explained by the variation in sorbent specific surface area, sorbent organic carbon content, and the sorbent-sorbate contact area. Furthermore, increasing sorbate thickness was related to a decrease in maximum adsorption capacities, which points to adsorption in micropores. Maximum adsorption capacities decreased by 1-2 orders of magnitude as the contact area increased by 50%. This points to adsorption sites being hardly larger than sorbates.
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