Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 346812
Title FUSSIM2: brief description of the simulation model and application to fertigation scenarios
Author(s) Heinen, M.
Source Agronomie 21 (2001)4. - ISSN 0249-5627 - p. 285 - 296.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/agro:2001124
Department(s) Soil Science Centre
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2001
Keyword(s) zero-sink uptake - mass-flow - diffusion - nutrients - constant - water - root
Abstract Standard theories for water movement, solute transport and uptake by roots can be applied to closed, recirculating cropping systems, even when coarse substrates are used. Some of these systems, such as bedding systems or potting plants, are vulnerable to accumulation of solutes in the root zone, which may be harmful to crop development. A two-dimensional simulation model for the above-mentioned processes is briefly described. This model can be used, amongst other possibilities, to search for good fertigation strategies in order to minimise solute accumulation in the root zone. This modelling approach can largely reduce the number of experiments. Some simulated scenarios showing different distributions of the electrical conductivity in a layer of 15-cm coarse sand are presented. This study is not meant to be an extensive search for the best fertigation strategy but to demonstrate how the simulation model can help in finding alternative strategies.
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