Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 348780
Title Limiting factors for the enzymatic accessibility of soybean protein
Author(s) Fischer, M.
Source Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Harry Gruppen; Fons Voragen. - [S.l.] : S.n. - ISBN 9085044960 - 139
Department(s) Food Chemistry Group
VLAG
Publication type Dissertation, internally prepared
Publication year 2006
Keyword(s) sojaeiwit - hydrolyse - aggregatie - koolhydraten - eiwitextractie - eiwitvertering - eiwitverteerbaarheid - peptiden - soya protein - hydrolysis - aggregation - carbohydrates - protein extraction - protein digestion - protein digestibility - peptides
Categories Plant Products
Abstract Soy is a commonly used ingredient is food and animal feed. With particular focus on the in-soluble fractions, this thesis deals with the effects of proteases and carbohydrate degrading enzymes on different soybean meals subjected to different extent of heating. The primary aim is to improve the understanding of enzymatic hydrolysis of SBM with emphasis on proteins and to identify barriers limiting the efficiency of the process. The results show that aggregation behavior of peptides during enzymatic processing of soy proteins is potentially a limiting factor for efficacy of protein extraction. Surprisingly, it is also demonstrated that aggregation is not limited to in vitro incubations, but is also occurring in vivo in the digestive system of pigs.
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