Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 349499
Title The Dutch N-cascade in the European perspective
Author(s) Erisman, J.W.; Domburg, N.; Vries, W. de; Kros, H.; Haan, B. de; Sanders, K.
Source Science in China Series C-Life Sciences 48 (2005)Spec Issue. - ISSN 1006-9305 - p. 827 - 842.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03187122
Department(s) Soil Science Centre
ALTERRA Wageningen UR
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2005
Keyword(s) global nitrogen-cycle - terrestrial ecosystems - deposition - netherlands - consequences - forest - soils - fluxes - sinks - fate
Abstract The Netherlands is "well known" for its nitrogen problems; it has one of the highest reactive nitrogen (Nr) emission densities in the world. It is a small country at the delta of several large European rivers. Ever since the industrial revolution, there has been a growing excess of nutrients and related emissions into the atmosphere (ammonia, nitrogen oxides and nitrous oxide) and into groundwater and surface water (nitrate), leading to a large range of cascading environmental impacts. Vehicular traffic, sewage and animal husbandry are the main sources of oxidized and reduced forms of Nr. This paper provides an overview of the origin and fate of nitrogen in the Netherlands, the various reported impacts of nitrogen, the Dutch and European policies to reduce nitrogen emissions and related impacts. In addition, ways are presented to go forward to potentially solve the problems in a European perspective. Solutions include the improvement of nitrogen efficiencies in different systems, technological options and education.
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