Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 351379
Title Influence of shear during enzymatic gelation of caseinate-water and caseinate-water-fat systems
Author(s) Manski, J.M.; Goot, A.J. van der; Boom, R.M.
Source Journal of Food Engineering 79 (2007)2. - ISSN 0260-8774 - p. 706 - 717.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2006.02.035
Department(s) Food Process Engineering
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2007
Keyword(s) cross-linking - microbial transglutaminase - rheological properties - sodium caseinate - food - gels - proteins - micelles - fracture - beef
Abstract Solidification, emulsification and application of shear were combined to induce diversity and heterogeneity in the micro- and macrostructure of concentrated caseinate-based food matrices containing a dispersed fat phase. The products were evaluated with selected parameters from small-scale and large-scale deformations and confocal scanning laser microscopy. Sodium caseinate (10¿30% w/w) was solidified with transglutaminase during mixing in a Brabender Do-Corder mixer, and palm fat (15% v/v) was emulsified either simultaneously during crosslinking, or after crosslinking. In absence of fat, granular caseinate structures were obtained. Adding fat prior to solidification and mixing resulted in strong homogeneous gels. Adding fat after solidification yielded protein granules surrounded by a concentrated fat phase. The structures were weaker and more brittle, and showed less strain hardening than the systems without fat, even though the linear viscoelastic properties were hardly different from the materials obtained by adding fat prior to mixing and solidification.
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