Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 355621
Title Molecular mechanisms of pathogenicity: how do pathogenic microorganisms develop cross-kingdom host jumps?
Author(s) Baarlen, P. van; Belkum, A. van; Summerbell, R.C.; Crous, P.W.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.
Source FEMS Microbiology Reviews 31 (2007)3. - ISSN 0168-6445 - p. 239 - 277.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6976.2007.00065.x
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS-2
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2007
Keyword(s) programmed cell-death - nf-kappa-b - staphylococcus-aureus pathogenesis - mucoid pseudomonas-aeruginosa - burkholderia-cepacia complex - microbial iron transport - cultured-mammalian-cells - iii protein secretion - f-sp lycopersici - cryptococcus-neoformans
Abstract It is common knowledge that pathogenic viruses can change hosts, with avian influenza, the HIV, and the causal agent of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob encephalitis as well-known examples. Less well known, however, is that host jumps also occur with more complex pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi. In extreme cases, these host jumps even cross kingdom of life barriers. A number of requirements need to be met to enable a microorganism to cross such kingdom barriers. Potential cross-kingdom pathogenic microorganisms must be able to come into close and frequent contact with potential hosts, and must be able to overcome or evade host defences. Reproduction on, in, or near the new host will ensure the transmission or release of successful genotypes. An unexpectedly high number of cross-kingdom host shifts of bacterial and fungal pathogens are described in the literature. Interestingly, the molecular mechanisms underlying these shifts show commonalities. The evolution of pathogenicity towards novel hosts may be based on traits that were originally developed to ensure survival in the microorganism's original habitat, including former hosts.
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