Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 355892
Title A rapid diversification of rainforest trees (Guatteria; Annonaceae) following dispersal from Central into South America.
Author(s) Erkens, R.H.J.; Chatrou, L.W.; Maas, J.W.; Niet, T. van der; Savolainen, V.
Source Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 44 (2007)1. - ISSN 1055-7903 - p. 399 - 411.
Department(s) Biosystematics
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2007
Keyword(s) historical biogeography - phylogeny reconstruction - dna-sequences - plastid rbcl - chloroplast - evolution - diversity - nuclear - amazon - genera
Abstract Several recent studies have suggested that a substantial portion of today¿s plant diversity in the Neotropics has resulted from the dispersal of taxa into that region rather than vicariance, but more data are needed to substantiate this claim. Guatteria (Annonaceae) is, with 265 species, the third largest genus of Neotropical trees after Inga (Fabaceae) and Ocotea (Lauraceae), and its widespread distribution and frequent occurrence makes the genus an excellent model taxon to study diversification patterns. This study reconstructed the phylogeny of Guatteria and inferred three major biogeographical events in the history of the genus: (1) a trans-oceanic Miocene migration from Central into South America before the closing of the Isthmus of Panama; (2) a major diversification of the lineage within South America; and (3) several migrations of South American lineages back into Central America via the closed Panamanian land bridge. Therefore, Guatteria is not an Amazonian centred-genus sensu Gentry but a major Miocene diversification that followed its dispersal into South America. This study provides further evidence that migration into the Neotropics was an important factor in the historical assembly of its biodiversity. Furthermore, it is shown that phylogenetic patterns are comparable to those found in Ocotea and Inga and that a closer comparison of these genera is desirable.
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