Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 357391
Title Nutritional iron deficiency
Author(s) Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.
Source The Lancet 370 (2007)9586. - ISSN 0140-6736 - p. 511 - 520.
Department(s) Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2007
Keyword(s) randomized controlled-trial - soluble transferrin receptor - folic-acid supplementation - routine prophylactic supplementation - reticulocyte hemoglobin content - helicobacter-pylori infection - placebo-controlled trial - reduced work capacity - task-force report
Abstract Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming monotonous plant-based diets. The high prevalence of iron deficiency in the developing world has substantial health and economic costs, including poor pregnancy outcome, impaired school performance, and decreased productivity. Recent studies have reported how the body regulates iron absorption and metabolism in response to changing iron status by upregulation or downregulation of key intestinal and hepatic proteins. Targeted iron supplementation, iron fortification of foods, or both, can control iron deficiency in populations. Although technical challenges limit the amount of bioavailable iron compounds that can be used in food fortification, studies show that iron fortification can be an effective strategy against nutritional iron deficiency. Specific laboratory measures of iron status should be used to assess the need for fortification and to monitor these interventions. Selective plant breeding and genetic engineering are promising new approaches to improve dietary iron nutritional quality.
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