Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 359003
Title Domestication and breeding of tomatoes: what have we gained and what can we gain in the future?
Author(s) Bai, Y.; Lindhout, P.
Source Annals of Botany 100 (2007)5. - ISSN 0305-7364 - p. 1085 - 1094.
Department(s) Laboratory of Plant Breeding
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2007
Keyword(s) quantitative trait loci - backcross qtl analysis - lycopersicon-esculentum - fruit size - cultivated tomato - solanum-lycopersicoides - genus lycopersicon - genetic diversity - natural variation - resistance genes
Abstract Background It has been shown that a large variation is present and exploitable from wild Solanum species but most of it is still untapped. Considering the thousands of Solanum accessions in different gene banks and probably even more that are still untouched in the Andes, it is a challenge to exploit the diversity of tomato. What have we gained from tomato domestication and breeding and what can we gain in the future? Scope This review summarizes progress on tomato domestication and breeding and current efforts in tomato genome research. Also, it points out potential challenges in exploiting tomato biodiversity and depicts future perspectives in tomato breeding with the emerging knowledge from tomato-omics. Conclusions From first domestication to modern breeding, the tomato has been continually subjected to human selection for a wide array of applications in both science and commerce. Current efforts in tomato breeding are focused on discovering and exploiting genes for the most important traits in tomato germplasm. In the future, breeders will design cultivars by a process named 'breeding by design' based on the combination of science and technologies from the genomic era as well as their practical skills.
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