Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 362069
Title Characterization and distribution of mating type genes in the Dothistroma needle blight pathogens
Author(s) Groenewald, M.; Barnes, I.; Bradshaw, R.E.; Brown, A.V.; Dale, A.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Lewis, K.J.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J.; Crous, P.W.
Source Phytopathology 97 (2007)7. - ISSN 0031-949X - p. 825 - 834.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-97-7-0825
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS-4
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2007
Keyword(s) pinus-radiata - scirrhia-pini - mycosphaerella-graminicola - dna-sequences - novo-ulmi - protein - cloning - cercospora - locus - idiomorphs
Abstract Dothistroma septosporum and D. pini are the two causal agents of Dothistroma needle blight of Pinus spp. in natural forests and plantations. Degenerate primers amplified portions of mating type genes (MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2) and chromosome walking was applied to obtain the full-length genes in both species. The mating-type-specific primers designed in this study could distinguish between the morphologically similar D. pini and D. septosporum and between the different mating types of these species. Screening of isolates from global collections of D. septosporum showed that only MAT2 isolates are present in Australian and New Zealand collections, where only the asexual form of the fungus has been found. In contrast, both mating types of D. septosporum were present in collections from Canada and Europe, where the sexual state is known. Intriguingly, collections from South Africa and the United Kingdom, where the sexual state of the fungus is unknown, included both mating types. In D. pini, for which no teleomorph is known, both mating types were present in collections from the United States. These results provided new insights into the biology and global distribution of two of the world's most important pine pathogens and should facilitate management of the diseases caused by these fungi.
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