Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 362537
Title Fine roots and ectomycorrhizas as indicators of environmental change.
Author(s) Cudlin, P.; Kieliszewska-Rokicka, B.; Rudawska, M.; Grebenc, T.; Alberton, O.; Lehto, T.; Bakker, M.R.; Borja, I.; Konopka, B.; Leski, T.; Kraigher, H.; Kuyper, T.W.
Source Plant Biosystems 141 (2007)3. - ISSN 1126-3504 - p. 406 - 425.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/11263500701626028
Department(s) Chair Soil Biology and Biological Soil Quality
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2007
Keyword(s) spruce picea-abies - pine pinus-sylvestris - experimental nitrogen addition - atmospheric carbon-dioxide - air ozone fumigation - sitchensis bong carr - norway spruce - scots pine - fagus-sylvatica - fungal communities
Abstract Human-induced and natural stress factors can affect fine roots and ectomycorrhizas. Therefore they have potential utility as indicators of environmental change. We evaluated, through meta-analysis, the magnitude of the effects of acidic deposition, nitrogen deposition, increased ozone levels, elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide, and drought on fine roots and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) characteristics. Ectomycorrhizal colonization was an unsuitable parameter for environmental change, but fine root length and biomass could be useful. Acidic deposition had a significantly negative impact on fine roots, root length being more sensitive than root biomass. There were no significant effects of nitrogen deposition or elevated tropospheric ozone on the quantitative root parameters. Elevated CO2 had a significant positive effect. Drought had a significantly negative effect on fine root biomass. The negative effect of acidic deposition and the positive effect of elevated CO2 increased over time, indicating that effects were persistent contrary the other factors. The meta-analysis also showed that experimental conditions, including both laboratory and field experiments, were a major source of variation. In addition to quantitative changes, environmental changes affect the species composition of the ectomycorrhizal fungal community.
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