Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 366626
Title Comparative BAC end sequence analysis of tomato and potato reveals overrepresentation of specific gene families in potato
Author(s) Datema, E.; Mueller, L.A.; Buels, R.; Giovannoni, J.J.; Visser, R.G.F.; Stiekema, W.; Ham, R.C.H.J. van
Source BMC Plant Biology 8 (2008). - ISSN 1471-2229
DOI https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2229-8-34
Department(s) Bioinformatics
Laboratory of Plant Breeding
PRI Bioscience
EPS-4
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2008
Keyword(s) chloroplast genome sequences - arabidopsis-thaliana - solanum-tuberosum - draft sequence - evolution - database - maps - organization - rice - microsatellites
Abstract Background: Tomato ( Solanum lycopersicon) and potato ( S. tuberosum) are two economically important crop species, the genomes of which are currently being sequenced. This study presents a first genome-wide analysis of these two species, based on two large collections of BAC end sequences representing approximately 19% of the tomato genome and 10% of the potato genome. Results: The tomato genome has a higher repeat content than the potato genome, primarily due to a higher number of retrotransposon insertions in the tomato genome. On the other hand, simple sequence repeats are more abundant in potato than in tomato. The two genomes also differ in the frequency distribution of SSR motifs. Based on EST and protein alignments, potato appears to contain up to 6,400 more putative coding regions than tomato. Major gene families such as cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases and serine-threonine protein kinases are significantly overrepresented in potato, compared to tomato. Moreover, the P450 superfamily appears to have expanded spectacularly in both species compared to Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting an expanded network of secondary metabolic pathways in the Solanaceae. Both tomato and potato appear to have a low level of microsynteny with A. thaliana. A higher degree of synteny was observed with Populus trichocarpa, specifically in the region between 15.2 and 19.4 Mb on P. trichocarpa chromosome 10. Conclusion: The findings in this paper present a first glimpse into the evolution of Solanaceous genomes, both within the family and relative to other plant species. When the complete genome sequences of these species become available, whole-genome comparisons and protein- or repeat-family specific studies may shed more light on the observations made here.
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