Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 369827
Title Effects of soaking, germination and fermentation on phytic acid, total and in vitro soluble zinc in brown rice
Author(s) Liang, J.; Han, B.Z.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hamer, R.J.
Source Food Chemistry 110 (2008)4. - ISSN 0308-8146 - p. 821 - 828.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2008.02.064
Department(s) Food Microbiology Laboratory
Food Chemistry Group
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2008
Keyword(s) reduce phytate content - whole wheat-flour - heat-treatment - pearl-millet - endogenous phytase - accessible iron - mineral-content - molar ratios - seeds - bioavailability
Abstract Rice is an important staple food in Asian countries. In rural areas it is also a major source of micronutrients. Unfortunately, the bioavailability of minerals, e.g. zinc from rice, is low because it is present as an insoluble complex with food components such as phytic acid. We investigated the effects of soaking, germination and fermentation with an aim to reduce the content of phytic acid, while maintaining sufficient levels of zinc, in the expectation of increasing its bioavailability. Fermentation treatments were most effective in decreasing phytic acid (56¿96% removal), followed by soaking at 10 °C after preheating (42¿59%). Steeping of intact kernels for 24 h at 25 °C had the least effect on phytic acid removal (
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