Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 369963
Title The discard problem - A comparative analysis of two fisheries: The English Nephrops fishery and the Dutch beam trawl fishery
Author(s) Catchpole, T.; Keeken, O.A. van; Gray, T.; Piet, G.J.
Source Ocean & Coastal Management 51 (2008)11. - ISSN 0964-5691 - p. 772 - 778.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2008.06.015
Department(s) IMARES
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2008
Keyword(s) north-sea plaice - catch - sole
Abstract Discarding is the throwing overboard of unwanted fish or benthic animals [In this study, we define discards in terms of discarded edible fish, crustaceans and benthic organisms. We exclude, therefore, discards of plant material, offal, sea mammals and sea birds.] that have been caught by sea fishing vessels. Some estimates suggest that up to 25% of the global amount of fish caught is discarded annually. In this comparative analysis of discarding in two contrasting North Sea fisheries ¿ the English Nephrops fishery and the Dutch beam trawl fishery ¿ we discuss the effectiveness of measures that might reduce their rates of discarding, including management measures, market forces and fisher's behaviour. Our findings are that despite the many differences between the two fisheries and their respective discard problems, one common thread ¿ the importance of appropriate incentives ¿ runs through both of them.
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