Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 370216
Title A note on modeling consumer reactions to a crisis: The case of the mad cow disease
Author(s) Pennings, J.M.E.; Wansink, B.; Meulenberg, M.T.G.
Source International Journal of Research in Marketing 19 (2002)1. - ISSN 0167-8116 - p. 91 - 100.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/S0167-8116(02)00050-2
Department(s) Marketing and Consumer Behaviour
MGS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2002
Keyword(s) risk-taking - perceived risk - empirical-test - utility - decisions - scale
Abstract What drives the behavior of consumers when faced with a product-related crisis, such as that involving food contamination or life-threatening design flaws? For both consumers and companies, these crises have become of increasing importance because of the globalization of markets and an increased coverage by the media. Marketers need to understand why and how consumers react to a crisis. We show that by decoupling risk response behavior of consumers into the separate components of risk perception and risk attitude, a more robust conceptualization and prediction of consumers' reactions is possible. Such a framework helps provide answers on how marketers can deal with such types of crises. The merits of this conceptualization are illustrated in two field studies that examine the reactions of German, Dutch, and American consumers to the BSE (mad cow disease) crisis
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