Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 372825
Title Transcriptome and proteonome profiling of colon mucosa from quercetin fed F344 rats point to tumor preventive mechanisms, increased mitochondrial fatty acid degradation and decreased glycolysis
Author(s) Dihal, A.A.; Hendriksen, P.J.M.; Charif, H.; Dekker, L.J.; IJsselstijn, L.; Boer, V.C.J. de; Alink, G.M.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Stierum, R.H.
Source Proteomics 8 (2008)1. - ISSN 1615-9853 - p. 45 - 61.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/pmic.200700364
Department(s) Sub-department of Toxicology
RIKILT - Business Unit Safety & Health
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2008
Keyword(s) gene-expression - colorectal-cancer - suppresses growth - messenger-rna - cell-line - identification - antioxidant - enrichment - pathway - targets
Abstract Quercetin has been shown to act as an anticarcinogen in experimental colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to characterize transcriptome and proteome changes occurring in the distal colon mucosa of rats supplemented with 10 g quercetin/kg diet for 11 wk. Transcriptome data analyzed with Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed that quercetin significantly downregulated the potentially oncogenic mitogen-activated protein kinase (Mapk) pathway. In addition, quercetin enhanced expression of tumor suppressor genes, including Pten, Tp53, and Msh2, and of cell cycle inhibitors, including Mutyh. Furthermore, dietary quercetin enhanced genes involved in phase I and II metabolism, including Fmo5, Ephx1, Ephx2, and Gpx2. Quercetin increased PPAR target genes, and concomitantly enhanced expression of genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid (FA) degradation. Proteomics performed in the same samples revealed 33 affected proteins, of which four glycolysis enzymes and three heat shock proteins were decreased. A proteome-transcriptome comparison showed a low correlation, but both pointed out toward altered energy metabolism. In conclusion, transcriptomics combined with proteomics showed that dietary quercetin evoked changes contrary to those found in colorectal carcinogenesis. These tumor-protective mechanisms were associated with a shift in energy production pathways, pointing at decreased cytoplasmic glycolysis and toward increased mitochondrial FA degradation.
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