Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 381484
Title Mite-mediated hyperphoretic dispersal of Ophiostoma spp. from the infructescences of South African Protea spp.
Author(s) Roets, F.; Crous, P.W.; Wingfield, M.J.; Dreyer, L.L.
Source Environmental Entomology 38 (2009)1. - ISSN 0046-225X - p. 143 - 152.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1603/022.038.0118
Department(s) Laboratory of Phytopathology
EPS-4
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2009
Keyword(s) bark beetles - tarsonemus-mites - fungi - coleoptera - scolytidae - acarina
Abstract Ophiostomatoid fungi are well known as economically important pathogens and agents of timber degradation. A unique assemblage of these arthropod-associated organisms including species of Gondwanamyces G. J. Marais and M. J. Wingf., and Ophiostoma Syd. and P. Syd. occur in the floral heads (infructescences) of Protea L. species in South Africa. It has recently been discovered that Ophiostoma found in Protea flower-heads are vectored by mites (Acarina) including species of: Tarsonemus Canestrini and Fonzago, Proctolaelaps Berlese, and Trichouropoda Berlese. It is, however, not known how the mites carry the fungi between host plants. In this study, we consider two possible modes of mite dispersal. These include self-dispersal between infructescences and dispersal through insect vectors. Results showed that, as infructescences desiccate, mites self-disperse to fresh moist infructescences. Long-range dispersal is achieved through a phoretic association with three beetle species: Genuchus hottentottus (F.), Trichostetha fascicularis L., and T. capensis L. The long-range, hyperphoretic dispersal of O. splendens G. J. Marais and M. J. Wingf. and O. phasma Roets et al. seemed effective, because their hosts were colonized during the first flowering season 3-4 yr after fire.
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