Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 38776
Title Determinants of Flemingia congesta and Dactyladenia barteri mulch decomposition in alley-cropping systems in the humid tropics.
Author(s) Henrot, J.; Brussaard, L.
Source Plant and Soil 191 (1997)1. - ISSN 0032-079X - p. 101 - 107.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1004274115587
Department(s) Soil Biology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 1997
Abstract Effects of soil macrofauna, micro-environment and mulch quantity were investigated on an acid Ultisol in a high-rainfall area in S.E. Nigeria, using litterbags or littertubes with leaves from the trees of an alley cropping system with t Flemingia congesta or t Dactyladenia barteri as hedgerow species.There was no effect of mulch quantity on the rate of decomposition. Soil macrofauna contributed to between 30 and 40% of mulch decomposition over the period of approximately 50% of disappearance of the original material. The faunal effect became apparent after a longer incubation period (>20 weeks) with the slower decomposing t Dactyladenia than with the t Flemingia mulch (immediate effect). This is presumably related to t Dactyladenia's higher lignin content (40% compared to 22% for t Flemingia). The t Flemingia mulch decomposed faster in alley cropping with t Dactyladenia hedgerow than with t Flemingia hedgerow, irrespective of faunal access, suggesting a microclimate efffect on decomposition. There were no marked changes in chemical composition of the mulches with decomposition period, except for a rapid decrease of K content in both mulches and a rapid increase in lignin content of the t Flemingia mulch within the first 10 days of decomposition, which indicates that early decomposition affected the relatively easily degradable compounds.
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.