Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 400649
Title Vegetation Re-development After Fen Meadow Restoration by Topsoil Removal and Hay Transfer
Author(s) Klimkowska, A.; Kotowski, W.; Diggelen, R.; Grootjans, A.P.; Dzierza, P.; Brzezinska, K.
Source Restoration Ecology 18 (2010)6. - ISSN 1061-2971 - p. 924 - 933.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-100X.2009.00554.x
Department(s) CL - Ecological Models and Monitoring
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) grassland productivity gradient - adhesive seed-dispersal - former arable fields - species richness - plant community - flood-meadow - wet meadows - soil - litter - establishment
Abstract We investigated the effects of different restoration treatments on the development of fen meadow communities: (1) depth of topsoil removal, with shallow (circa 20 cm) and deep (circa 40 cm) soil removal applied, (2) transfer of seed-containing hay, and (3) access of large animals. We carried out a full factorial experiment with all combinations of these factors and monitored it for 4 years. We studied the effect of seed availability in the soil seed bank on species abundance in the vegetation and compared it to the effect of species introduction by hay. We observed large differences in species composition between different treatments after 4 years. The combination of hay transfer, deep soil removal, and exclusion of large animals resulted in a community with highest similarity to the target vegetation. We found that the transfer of seeds with hay had a larger effect on species abundance than the soil seed bank. Hay transfer appeared to have important consequences on vegetation development because it speeded up the establishment of the target vegetation.
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