Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 400678
Title Microbial production of bulk chemicals: development of anaerobic processes
Author(s) Weusthuis, R.A.; Lamot, I.; Oost, J. van der; Sanders, J.P.M.
Source Trends in Biotechnology 29 (2011)4. - ISSN 0167-7799 - p. 153 - 158.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tibtech.2010.12.007
Department(s) Biobased Chemistry and Technology
Microbiological Laboratory
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) escherichia-coli - saccharomyces-cerevisiae - corynebacterium-glutamicum - glycerol production - acid production - succinic acid - fermentation - transhydrogenase - regeneration - metabolism
Abstract nnovative fermentation processes are necessary for the cost-effective production of bulk chemicals from renewable resources. Current microbial processes are either anaerobic processes, with high yield and productivity, or less-efficient aerobic processes. Oxygen utilization plays an important role in energy generation and redox metabolism that is necessary for product formation. The aerobic productivity, however, is relatively low because of rate-limiting volumetric oxygen transfer; whereas the product yield in the presence of oxygen is generally low because part of the substrate is completely oxidized to CO2. Hence, new microbial conversion processes for the production of bulk chemicals should be anaerobic. In this opinion article, we describe different scenarios for the development of highly efficient microbial conversion processes for the anaerobic production of bulk chemicals
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