Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 401514
Title Evaluation of an approach for the characterization of reactive and available pools of twenty potentially toxic elements in soils: Part I – The role of key soil properties in the variation of contaminants’ reactivity
Author(s) Rodrigues, S.M.; Henriques, B.; Ferreira da Silva, E.; Pereira, M.E.; Duarte, A.C.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.
Source Chemosphere 81 (2010)11. - ISSN 0045-6535 - p. 1549 - 1559.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2010.07.026
Department(s) SS - Soil Chemistry and Nature
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) iberian pyrite belt - heavy-metals - acid soils - organic-matter - trace-elements - mercury - extraction - sediments - desorption - speciation
Abstract Harmful effects of potentially toxic elements (PTE’s) in soils relate to their geochemically reactive fraction. To assess the degree of the reactivity, specific extractions or models are needed. Here we applied a 0.43 M HNO3 chemical extraction to assess reactive pools of a broad range of PTE’s in 136 contaminated and non-contaminated soils. Furthermore we derived Freundlich-type models based on commonly available soil properties (pH, organic carbon and clay) as well as extended models that used other properties such as amorphous Al and Fe oxides and evaluated their possible use in risk assessment. The approach allowed to predict the reactivity of As, Hg, Co, U, Ba, Se, Sb, Mo, Li, Be (r2: 0.55–0.90) elements not previously included in such studies, as well as that of Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni and Cr (r2: 0.73–0.90). The inclusion of pH, organic carbon and clay improved the performance of all models except for Be and Mo, although the role of clay is not completely clear and requires further investigation. The ability of amorphous metal oxides to affect the reactivity of As, Hg, Cu, Ni, Cr, Sb, Mo and Li was expressed by the models in agreement with known geochemical processes leading to the retention of PTE’s by the solid matrix. Hence, such approach can be a useful tool to account for regional differences in soil properties during the identification of risk areas and constitute a significantly more powerful tool than the analysis of total pools of PTE’s in soils.
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