Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 401665
Title The yield gap of global grain production: A spatial analysis
Author(s) Neumann, K.; Verburg, P.H.; Stehfest, E.; Müller, C.
Source Agricultural Systems 103 (2010)5. - ISSN 0308-521X - p. 316 - 326.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agsy.2010.02.004
Department(s) Land Dynamics
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) frontier production-functions - land-use - climate-change - agricultural intensification - technical efficiency - crop production - food security - china - wheat - determinants
Abstract Global grain production has increased dramatically during the past 50 years, mainly as a consequence of intensified land management and introduction of new technologies. For the future, a strong increase in grain demand is expected, which may be fulfilled by further agricultural intensification rather than expansion of agricultural area. Little is known, however, about the global potential for intensification and its constraints. In the presented study, we analyze to what extent the available spatially explicit global biophysical and land management-related data are able to explain the yield gap of global grain production. We combined an econometric approach with spatial analysis to explore the maximum attainable yield, yield gap, and efficiencies of wheat, maize, and rice production. Results show that the actual grain yield in some regions is already approximating its maximum possible yields while other regions show large yield gaps and therefore tentative larger potential for intensification. Differences in grain production efficiencies are significantly correlated with irrigation, accessibility, market influence, agricultural labor, and slope. Results of regional analysis show, however, that the individual contribution of these factors to explaining production efficiencies strongly varies between world-regions.
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