Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 401954
Title Ecosystem responses to reduced and oxidised nitrogen inputs in European terrestrial habitats
Author(s) Stevens, C.J.; Manning, P.; Berg, L.J.L. van den; Graaf, M.C.C. de; Wamelink, G.W.W.; Boxman, A.W.; Bleeker, A.; Vergeer, P.; Arroniz-Crespo, M.; Limpens, J.; Lamers, L.P.M.; Bobbink, R.; Dorland, E.
Source Environmental Pollution 159 (2011)3. - ISSN 0269-7491 - p. 665 - 676.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2010.12.008
Department(s) CL - Ecological Models and Monitoring
Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
WIAS
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) spruce picea-abies - soil solution chemistry - pinus-sylvestris l - atmospheric ammonia - throughfall deposition - nitrate reduction - acidic grasslands - intracellular ph - species richness - vascular plants
Abstract While it is well established that ecosystems display strong responses to elevated nitrogen deposition, the importance of the ratio between the dominant forms of deposited nitrogen (NHx and NOy) in determining ecosystem response is poorly understood. As large changes in the ratio of oxidised and reduced nitrogen inputs are occurring, this oversight requires attention. One reason for this knowledge gap is that plants experience a different NHx:NOy ratio in soil to that seen in atmospheric deposits because atmospheric inputs are modified by soil transformations, mediated by soil pH. Consequently species of neutral and alkaline habitats are less likely to encounter high NH4+ concentrations than species from acid soils. We suggest that the response of vascular plant species to changing ratios of NHx:NOy deposits will be driven primarily by a combination of soil pH and nitrification rates. Testing this hypothesis requires a combination of experimental and survey work in a range of systems.
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