Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 402794
Title Of Models and Meanings: Cultural Resilience in Social–Ecological Systems
Author(s) Crane, T.A.
Source Ecology and Society 15 (2010)4. - ISSN 1708-3087 - p. 19 - 19.
Department(s) Technology and Agrarian Development
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) farmer-herder conflicts - climate-change - environmental-change - resource-management - political ecology - rural-development - african sahel - west-africa - drought - livelihoods
Abstract Modeling has emerged as a key technology in analysis of social–ecological systems. However, the tendency for modeling to focus on the mechanistic materiality of biophysical systems obscures the diversity of performative social behaviors and normative cultural positions of actors within the modeled system. The fact that changes in the biophysical system can be culturally constructed in different ways means that the perception and pursuit of adaptive pathways can be highly variable. Furthermore, the adoption of biophysically resilient livelihoods can occur under conditions that are subjectively experienced as the radical transformation of cultural systems. The objectives of this work are to: (1) highlight the importance of understanding the place of culture within social–ecological systems, (2) explore the tensions between empirical and normative positions in the analysis of social–ecological resilience, and (3) suggest how empirical modeling of social–ecological systems can synergistically interact with normative aspects of livelihoods and lifeways.
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