Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 403355
Title Extensive metabolic cross-talk in melon fruit revealed by spatial and developmental combinatorial metabolomics
Author(s) Moing, A.; Aharoni, A.; Biais, B.; Rogachev, I.; Meir, S.; Brodsky, L.; Allwood, J.W.; Erban, A.; Dunn, W.B.; Kay, S.; Koning, S.; Vos, C.H. de; Jonker, H.H.; Mumm, R.; Deborde, C.; Maucourt, M.; Bernillon, S.; Gibon, Y.; Hansen, T.H.; Husted, S.; Goodacre, R.; Kopka, J.; Schjoerring, J.K.; Rolin, D.; Hall, R.D.
Source New Phytologist 190 (2011)3. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 683 - 696.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03626.x
Department(s) PRI Bioscience
PRI BIOS Applied Metabolic Systems
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) mass-spectrometry data - cucumis-melo - gas-chromatography - network analysis - aroma volatiles - gene-expression - tomato - plants - l. - identification
Abstract Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the small intestinal mucosa. The causative agents have been identified as gluten proteins from wheat, barley and rye, and the only available treatment for CD patients is a lifelong gluten-free diet. Non-gluten containing cereals would be a valuable contribution to the gluten-free diet. In this respect, oats are a good choice. However, commercial lots of oat flakes and flour frequently are contaminated with wheat, barley and rye, and two studies have reported that some peptides derived from the gluten-like avenin storage proteins of oat can trigger an immune response in some CD patients. In the present study we have initiated the investigation whether all oat varieties contain similar amounts of potentially harmful sequences by biochemical and immunological methods. We confirm that commercial oat preparations are contaminated with other cereals that contain gluten or gluten-like proteins. Moreover, our results demonstrate that contamination-free oat varieties differ in their capacity to stimulate an avenin-sensitive gamma-gliadin specific T cell line derived from a patient with CD, indicative for differences in the two known avenin epitopes among oat varieties, implying that selection and breeding of completely safe oat varieties for all CD patients may be a realistic possibility.
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