Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 403407
Title Contrasting time trends of organic contaminants in Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs
Author(s) Brink, N.W. van den; Riddle, M.J.; Heuvel-Greve, M.J. van den; Franeker, J.A. van
Source Marine Pollution Bulletin 62 (2011)1. - ISSN 0025-326X - p. 128 - 132.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2010.09.002
Department(s) CE - Molecular Ecology Ecotoxicology and Wildlife Management
IMARES Delta
IMARES Ecosystemen
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) arctic marine ecosystem - south polar skua - ross-sea - organochlorine pollutants - chlorinated hydrocarbons - catharacta-maccormicki - melting glaciers - temporal trends - probable source - adelie penguin
Abstract We demonstrate that pelagic Antarctic seabirds show significant decreases in concentrations of some persistent organic pollutants. Trends in Adélie penguins and Southern fulmars fit in a general pattern revealed by a broad literature review. Downward trends are also visible in pelagic fish, contrasting sharply with steady or increasing concentrations in Antarctic benthic organisms. Transfer of contaminants between Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs is associated with seasonal sea-ice dynamics which may influence the balance between the final receptors of contaminants under different climatic conditions. This complicates the predictability of future trends of emerging compounds in the Antarctic ecosystem, such as of the brominated compounds that we detected in Antarctic petrels. The discrepancy in trends between pelagic and benthic organisms shows that Antarctic biota are still final receptors of globally released organic contaminants and it remains questionable whether the total environmental burden of contaminants in the Antarctic ecosystem is declining.
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