Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 404924
Title Sharply higher rates of iron deficiency in obese Mexican women and children are predicted by obesity-related inflammation rather than by differences in dietary iron intake
Author(s) Cepeda-Lopez, A.C.; Osendarp, S.J.M.; Boonstra, A.; Aeberli, I.; Gonzalez-Salazar, F.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Villalpando, S.; Zimmermann, M.B.
Source American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 93 (2011)5. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 975 - 983.
Department(s) Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
Chair Nutrition and Disease
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) nutrition survey 1999 - c-reactive protein - overweight children - serum hepcidin - united-states - normal-weight - adolescents - hypoferremia - population - countries
Abstract Background: Obese individuals may be at increased risk of iron deficiency (ID), but it is unclear whether this is due to poor dietary iron intakes or to adiposity-related inflammation. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relations between body mass index (BMI), dietary iron, and dietary factors affecting iron bioavailability, iron status, and inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP)] in a transition country where obesity and ID are common. Design: Data from the 1999 Mexican Nutrition Survey, which included 1174 children (aged 5–12 y) and 621 nonpregnant women (aged 18–50 y), were analyzed. Results: The prevalence of obesity was 25.3% in women and 3.5% in children. The prevalence of ID was significantly (P <0.05) higher in obese women and children compared with normal-weight subjects [odds ratios (95% CIs): 1.92 (1.23, 3.01) and 3.96 (1.34, 11.67) for women and children, respectively]. Despite similar dietary iron intakes in the 2 groups, serum iron concentrations were lower in obese women than in normal-weight women (62.6 ± 29.5 compared with 72.4 ± 34.6 µg/dL; P = 0.014), and total-iron-binding capacity was higher in obese children than in normal-weight children (399 ± 51 compared with 360 ± 48 µg/dL; P <0.001). CRP concentrations in obese women and children were 4 times those of their normal-weight counterparts (P <0.05). CRP but not iron intake was a strong negative predictor of iron status, independently of BMI (P <0.05). Conclusions: The risk of ID in obese Mexican women and children was 2–4 times that of normal-weight individuals at similar dietary iron intakes. This increased risk of ID may be due to the effects of obesity-related inflammation on dietary iron absorption. Thus, ID control efforts in Mexico may be hampered by increasing rates of adiposity in women and children
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.