Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 405073
Title Climatic modifiers of the response to nitrogen deposition in peat-forming Sphagnum mosses: a meta-analysis
Author(s) Limpens, J.; Granath, G.; Gunnarson, U.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.
Source New Phytologist 191 (2011)2. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 496 - 507.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2011.03680.x
Department(s) Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
Earth System Science
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) global change - nutritional constraints - terrestrial ecosystems - carbon accumulation - species richness - ombrotrophic bog - vascular plants - n deposition - water-table - growth
Abstract • Peatlands in the northern hemisphere have accumulated more atmospheric carbon (C) during the Holocene than any other terrestrial ecosystem, making peatlands long-term C sinks of global importance. Projected increases in nitrogen (N) deposition and temperature make future accumulation rates uncertain.• Here, we assessed the impact of N deposition on peatland C sequestration potential by investigating the effects of experimental N addition on Sphagnum moss. We employed meta-regressions to the results of 107 field experiments, accounting for sampling dependence in the data.• We found that high N loading (comprising N application rate, experiment duration, background N deposition) depressed Sphagnum production relative to untreated controls. The interactive effects of presence of competitive vascular plants and high tissue N concentrations indicated intensified biotic interactions and altered nutrient stochiometry as mechanisms underlying the detrimental N effects. Importantly, a higher summer temperature (mean for July) and increasedannual precipitation intensified the negative effects of N. The temperature effect was comparable to an experimental application of almost 4 g N m-2 yr-1 for each 1°C increase.• Our results indicate that current rates of N deposition in a warmer environment will strongly inhibit C sequestration by Sphagnum-dominated vegetation
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