Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 405327
Title Dry season mapping of savanna forage quality, using the hyperspectral Carnegie
Author(s) Knox, N.; Skidmore, A.K.; Prins, H.H.T.; Asner, P.; Werff, H.M.A. van der; Boer, W.F. de; Waal, C. van der; Knegt, H.J. de; Kohi, E.; Slotow, R.; Grant, R.C.
Source Remote Sensing of Environment 115 (2011)6. - ISSN 0034-4257 - p. 1478 - 1488.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2011.02.007
Department(s) Resource Ecology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) kruger-national-park - african savannas - neural-networks - south-africa - absorption features - leaf biochemistry - mineral-nutrition - grass quality - nitrogen - reflectance
Abstract Forage quality within an African savanna depends upon limiting nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) and nutrients that constrain the intake rates (non-digestible fibre) of herbivores. These forage quality nutrients are particularly crucial in the dry season when concentrations of limiting nutrients decline and non-digestible fibres increase. Using artificial neural networks we test the ability of a new imaging spectrometer (CAO Alpha sensor), both alone and in combination with ancillary data, to map quantities of grass forage nutrients in the early dry season within an African savanna. Respectively 65%, 57% and 41%, of the variance in fibre, phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations were explained. We found that all grass forage nutrients show response to fire and soil. Principal component analysis, not only reduced image dimensionality, but was a useful method for removing cross-track illumination effects in the CAO imagery. To further improve the mapping of forage nutrients in the dry season we suggest that spectra within the shortwave infrared (SWIR) region, or additional relevant ancillary data, are required.
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