Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 405993
Title Natural genetic variation in plant photosynthesis
Author(s) Flood, P.J.; Harbinson, J.; Aarts, M.G.M.
Source Trends in Plant Science 16 (2011)6. - ISSN 1360-1385 - p. 327 - 335.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2011.02.005
Department(s) Laboratory of Genetics
Horticultural Supply Chains
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) quantitative trait loci - association mapping population - recurrent phenotypic selection - genome-wide association - wheat triticum-aestivum - rice oryza-sativa - chlorophyll fluorescence - qtl analysis - arabidopsis-thaliana - leaf photosynthesis
Abstract Natural genetic variation in plant photosynthesis is a largely unexplored and as a result an underused genetic resource for crop improvement. Numerous studies show genetic variation in photosynthetic traits in both crop and wild species, and there is an increasingly detailed knowledge base concerning the interaction of photosynthetic phenotypes with their environment. The genetic factors that cause this variation remain largely unknown. Investigations into natural genetic variation in photosynthesis will provide insights into the genetic regulation of this complex trait. Such insights can be used to understand evolutionary processes that affect primary production, allow greater understanding of the genetic regulation of photosynthesis and ultimately increase the productivity of our crops
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