Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 405999
Title Source Determination of Nitrous Oxide Based on Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Tracing: Dealing with Oxygen exchange
Author(s) Kool, D.M.; Groenigen, J.W. van; Wrage, N.
Source In: Methods in Enzymology : Research on Nitrification and Related Processes, Part B Volume 496 / Klotz, M.G., Stein, L.Y., Burlington : Elsevier - ISBN 9780123864895 - p. 139 - 160.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-386489-5.00006-3
Department(s) Chair Soil Biology and Biological Soil Quality
Sub-department of Soil Quality
PE&RC
Publication type Peer reviewed book chapter
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) dissimilatory nitrate reduction - ammonia-oxidizing bacteria - nitrifier denitrification - nitrosomonas-europaea - labeling method - stable-isotope - soil - n2o - nitrification - water
Abstract Source determination of nitrous oxide (N2O) from soils has so far been complicated by methodological constraints: the frequently used 15N tracer method could not differentiate between pathways related to nitrification, that is, nitrifier nitrification (NN), nitrifier denitrification (ND), and nitrification-coupled denitrification (NCD). To overcome this problem, a dual isotope method using both 15N and 18O was proposed. However, O exchange between nitrogen oxides and water has been found to disturb such a method. We here explain in detail a novel dual isotope method that allows to quantify O exchange in denitrification and to differentiate N2O production from NN, ND, NCD, and fertilizer denitrification (FD). The method has already been applied to a range of soils with good success. Potential of and scope for further improvement of the method are discussed
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