Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 406064
Title Comparing government agendas: executive speeches in the Netherlands, United Kingdom, and Denmark
Author(s) Mortensen, P.B.; Green-Pedersen, C.; Breeman, G.E.; Chaqués Bonafont, L.; Jennings, W.; John, P.; Palau, A.; Timmermans, A.
Source Comparative Political Studies 44 (2011)8. - ISSN 0010-4140 - p. 973 - 1000.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0010414011405162
Department(s) Public Administration and Policy
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) political attention - queens speech - policy - parties - competition - programs - states - matter - model - us
Abstract At the beginning of each parliamentary session, almost all European governments give a speech in which they present the government’s policy priorities and legislative agenda for the year ahead. Despite the body of literature on governments in European parliamentary democracies, systematic research on these executive policy agendas is surprisingly limited. In this article the authors study the executive policy agendas—measured through the policy content of annual government speeches—over the past 50 years in three Western European countries: the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Denmark. Contrary to the expectations derived from the well-established “politics matters” approach, the analyses show that elections and change in partisan color have little effect on the executive issue agendas, except to a limited extent for the United Kingdom. In contrast, the authors demonstrate empirically how the policy agenda of governments responds to changes in public problems, and this affects how political parties define these problems as political issues. In other words, policy responsibility that follows from having government power seems much more important for governments’ issue agendas than the partisan and institutional characteristics of governments
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