Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 406153
Title What are the main climate drivers for shrub growth in Northeastern Siberian tundra?
Author(s) Blok, D.; Sass-Klaassen, U.; Schaepman-Strub, G.; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Sauren, P.; Berendse, F.
Source Biogeosciences 8 (2011)5. - ISSN 1726-4170 - p. 1169 - 1179.
Department(s) Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
Forest Ecology and Forest Management
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) plant functional types - alaskan arctic tundra - summer temperature - nitrogen mineralization - tree growth - manipulation experiment - environmental-change - cassiope-tetragona - vegetation types - northern alaska
Abstract Deciduous shrubs are expected to rapidly expand in the Arctic during the coming decades due to climate warming. A transition towards more shrub-dominated tundra may have large implications for the regional surface energy balance, permafrost stability and carbon storage capacity, with consequences for the global climate system. However, little information is available on the natural long-term shrub growth response to climatic variability. Our aim was to determine the climate factor and time period that are most important to annual shrub growth in our research site in NE-Siberia. Therefore, we determined annual radial growth rates in Salix pulchra and Betula nana shrubs by measuring ring widths. We constructed shrub ring width chronologies and compared growth rates to regional climate and remotely sensed greenness data. Early summer temperature was the most important factor influencing ring width of S. pulchra (Pearson's r=0.73, p
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