Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 407109
Title Terrestrial Ecosystem Responses to Species Gains and Losses
Author(s) Wardle, D.A.; Bardgett, R.D.; Callaway, R.; Putten, W.H. van der
Source Science 332 (2011)6035. - ISSN 0036-8075 - p. 1273 - 1277.
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) climate-change - changing environment - nitrogen-fixation - plant-communities - diversity - biodiversity - invasion - impacts - restoration - herbivores
Abstract Ecosystems worldwide are losing some species and gaining others, resulting in an interchange of species that is having profound impacts on how these ecosystems function. However, research on the effects of species gains and losses has developed largely independently of one another. Recent conceptual advances regarding effects of species gain have arisen from studies that have unraveled the mechanistic basis of how invading species with novel traits alter biotic interactions and ecosystem processes. In contrast, studies on traits associated with species loss are fewer, and much remains unknown about how traits that predispose species to extinction affect ecological processes. Species gains and losses are both consequences and drivers of global change; thus, explicit integration of research on how both processes simultaneously affect ecosystem functioning is key to determining the response of the Earth system to current and future human activities
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