Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 407324
Title Does Obesity Increase Risk for Iron Deficiency? A Review of the Literature and the Potential Mechanisms
Author(s) Cepeda-Lopez, A.C.; Aeberli, I.; Zimmermann, M.B.
Source International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research 80 (2010)45. - ISSN 0300-9831 - p. 263 - 270.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0300-9831/a000033
Department(s) Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
VLAG
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) serum transferrin receptor - body-mass index - nutrition transition - hepcidin expression - overweight children - school-children - united-states - normal-weight - adolescents - women
Abstract Increasing obesity is a major global health concern while at the same time iron-deficiency anemia remains common worldwide. Although these two conditions represent opposite ends of the spectrum of over- and under-nutrition, they appear to be linked: overweight individuals are at higher risk of iron deficiency than normal-weight individuals. Potential explanations for this association include dilutional hypoferremia, poor dietary iron intake, increased iron requirements, and/or impaired iron absorption in obese individuals. Recent evidence suggests obesity-related inflammation may play a central role through its regulation of hepcidin. Hepcidin levels are higher in obese individuals and are linked to subclinical inflammation; this may reduce iron absorption and blunt the effects of iron fortification. Thus, low iron status in overweight individuals may result from a combination of nutritional (reduced absorption) and functional (increased sequestration) iron deficiency. In this review, we focus on subclinical inflammation in obesity, and its effect on hepcidin levels, as the most plausible explanation for The link between iron deficiency and obesity.
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