Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 407687
Title The Role of Plant Hormones in Nematode Feeding Cell Formation
Author(s) Goverse, A.; Bird, D.
Source In: Genomics and Molecular Genetics of Plant-Nematode Interactions / Jones, J., Fenoll, C., Gheysen, G., Londen : Springer - ISBN 9789400704336 - p. 325 - 347.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0434-3_16
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
EPS-2
Publication type Peer reviewed book chapter
Publication year 2011
Abstract In this Chapter, we discuss recent advances in the role of plant hormones in the molecular mechanisms underlying feeding cell formation both by cyst (CN) and root-knot nematodes (RKN). Phytohormones are small signalling molecules that regulate plant growth and development, including the formation of highly specialized root structures like nematode feeding cells. High-throughput transcriptome profiling has facilitated the identification of an increasing number of novel hormone related genes that are differentially expressed during feeding cell development. Together with dedicated functional studies, a picture has emerged which points to plant hormones playing an important role in the reprogramming of gene expression patterns upon nematode infection. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of the role of classical plant hormones, including cytokinin, auxin and ethylene, in the establishment of nematode-induced regulatory networks upon infection of plant roots. We also discuss the role of small peptides as a novel class in plant hormone signalling during feeding cell formation
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