Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 408149
Title Early soil knowledge and the birth and development of soil science
Author(s) Brevik, E.C.; Hartemink, A.E.
Source Catena 83 (2010)1. - ISSN 0341-8162 - p. 23 - 33.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2010.06.011
Department(s) International Soil Reference and Information Centre
ICSU World Data Centre for Soils
ISRIC - World Soil Information
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) historical development - cropping systems - united-states - sustainability - principles - evolution - students - pedology - society - trends
Abstract Soils knowledge dates to the earliest known practice of agriculture about 11,000 BP Civilizations all around the world showed various levels of soil knowledge by the 4th century AD, including irrigation, the use of terraces to control erosion, various ways of improving soil fertility, and ways to create productive artificial soils. Early soils knowledge was largely based on observations of nature: experiments to test theories were not conducted. Many famous scientists, for example, Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, Charles Darwin, and Leonardo da Vinci worked on soils issues. Soil science did not become a true science, however, until the 19th century with the development of genetic soil science, led by Vasilii V Dokuchaev In the 20th century, soil science moved beyond its agricultural roots and soil information is now used in residential development, the planning of highways, building foundations, septic systems, wildlife management, environmental management, and many other applications in addition to agriculture
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