Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 408336
Title Identification of Genes in the Phenylalanine Metabolic Pathway by Ectopic Expression of a MYB Transcription Factor in Tomato Fruit
Author(s) Cin, V. Dal; Tieman, D.M.; Tohge, T.; McQuinn, R.; Vos, C.H.R. de; Osorio, S.; Schmelz, E.A.; Taylor, M.G.; Smits-Kroon, M.T.; Schuurink, R.C.; Haring, M.A.; Giovannoni, J.; Fernie, A.R.; Klee, H.J.
Source The Plant Cell 23 (2011)7. - ISSN 1040-4651 - p. 2738 - 2753.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1105/tpc.111.086975
Department(s) PRI BIOS Applied Metabolic Systems
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) chromatography-mass spectrometry - prephenate aminotransferase - amino-acids - lycopersicon-esculentum - arabidopsis-thaliana - escherichia-coli - microarray data - cell-cultures - biosynthesis - arogenate
Abstract Altering expression of transcription factors can be an effective means to coordinately modulate entire metabolic pathways in plants. It can also provide useful information concerning the identities of genes that constitute metabolic networks. Here, we used ectopic expression of a MYB transcription factor, Petunia hybrida ODORANT1, to alter Phe and phenylpropanoid metabolism in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits. Despite the importance of Phe and phenylpropanoids to plant and human health, the pathway for Phe synthesis has not been unambiguously determined. Microarray analysis of ripening fruits from transgenic and control plants permitted identification of a suite of coregulated genes involved in synthesis and further metabolism of Phe. The pattern of coregulated gene expression facilitated discovery of the tomato gene encoding prephenate aminotransferase, which converts prephenate to arogenate. The expression and biochemical data establish an arogenate pathway for Phe synthesis in tomato fruits. Metabolic profiling and 13C flux analysis of ripe fruits further revealed large increases in the levels of a specific subset of phenylpropanoid compounds. However, while increased levels of these human nutrition-related phenylpropanoids may be desirable, there were no increases in levels of Phe-derived flavor volatiles.
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