Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 408751
Title Geospatial tools address emerging issues in spatial ecology: A review and commentary on the special issue
Author(s) Skidmore, A.K.; Franklin, J.; Dawson, T.P.; Pilesjo, P.
Source International Journal of Geographical Information Science 25 (2011)3. - ISSN 1365-8816 - p. 337 - 365.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13658816.2011.554296
Department(s) Resource Ecology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) remotely-sensed data - global vegetation model - california coastal shrublands - generalized additive-models - bioclimate envelope models - land-cover classification - altered fire regimes - modis time-series - climate-change - southern california
Abstract Spatial ecology focuses on the role of space and time in ecological processes and events from a local to a global scale and is particularly relevant in developing environmental policy and (mandated) monitoring goals. In other words, spatial ecology is where geography and ecology intersect, and high-quality geospatial data and analysis tools are required to address emerging issues in spatial ecology. In this commentary and review for the International Journal of GIS Special Issue on Spatial Ecology, we highlight selected current research priorities in spatial ecology and describe geospatial data and methods for addressing these tasks. Geoinformation research themes are identified in population ecology, community and landscape ecology, and ecosystem ecology, and these themes are further linked to the assessment of ecosystem services. Methods in spatial ecology benefit from explicit consideration of spatial autocorrelation, and applications discussed in this review include species distribution modeling, remote sensing of community and ecosystem properties, and models of climate change. The linkages of the Special Issue papers to these emerging issues are described
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