Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 409403
Title Stochastic modeling of salt accumulation in the root zone due to capillary flux from brackish groundwater
Author(s) Shah, S.H.H.; Vervoort, R.W.; Suweis, S.; Guswa, A.J.; Rinaldo, A.; Zee, S.E.A.T.M. van der
Source Water Resources Research 47 (2011)9. - ISSN 0043-1397 - 17
DOI https://doi.org/10.1029/2010WR009790
Department(s) Soil Physics, Ecohydrology and Groundwater Management
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) bodemchemie - verzilting - bodem-plant relaties - wortelzonestroom - grondwater - modellen - soil chemistry - salinization - soil plant relationships - root zone flux - groundwater - models - water-controlled ecosystems - soil-moisture dynamics - hydraulic redistribution - solute transport - eucalyptus-camaldulensis - hydrologic processes - active-role - irrigation - vegetation - salinity
Categories Soil Chemistry
Abstract Groundwater can be a source of both water and salts in semiarid areas, and therefore, capillary pressure–induced upward water flow may cause root zone salinization. To identify which conditions result in hazardous salt concentrations in the root zone, we combined the mass balance equations for salt and water, further assuming a Poisson-distributed daily rainfall and brackish groundwater quality. For the water fluxes (leaching, capillary upflow, and evapotranspiration), we account for osmotic effects of the dissolved salt mass using Van‘t Hoff's law. Root zone salinity depends on salt transport via capillary flux and on evapotranspiration, which concentrates salt in the root zone. Both a wet climate and shallow groundwater lead to wetter root zone conditions, which in combination with periodic rainfall enhances salt removal by leaching. For wet climates, root zone salinity (concentrations) increases as groundwater is more shallow (larger groundwater influence). For dry climates, salinity increases as groundwater is deeper because of a drier root zone and less leaching. For intermediate climates, opposing effects can push the salt balance either way. Root zone salinity increases almost linearly with groundwater salinity. With a simple analytical approximation, maximum concentrations can be related to the mean capillary flow rate, leaching rate, water saturation, and groundwater salinity for different soils, climates, and groundwater depths.
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