Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 409714
Title Evolution of sexual dimorphism in the Lepidoptera
Author(s) Allen, C.E.; Zwaan, B.J.; Brakefield, P.M.
Source Annual Review of Entomology 56 (2011). - ISSN 0066-4170 - p. 445 - 464.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-120709-144828
Department(s) Laboratory of Genetics
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) butterfly bicyclus-anynana - western white butterflies - wing pattern evolution - life-history traits - female mate choice - size dimorphism - papilio-polyxenes - neotropical butterflies - heliconius butterflies - phenotypic plasticity
Abstract Among the animals, the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) are second only to beetles in number of described species and are known for their striking intra- and interspecific diversity. Within species, sexual dimorphism is a source of variation in life history (e.g., sexual size dimorphism and protandry), morphology (e.g., wing shape and color pattern), and behavior (e.g., chemical and visual signaling). Sexual selection and mating systems have been considered the primary forces driving the evolution of sexual dimorphism in the Lepidoptera, and alternative hypotheses have been neglected. Here, we examine opportunities for sexual selection, natural selection, and the interplay between the two forces in the evolution of sexual differences in the moths and butterflies. Our primary goal is to identify mechanisms that either facilitate or constrain the evolution of sexual dimorphism, rather than to resolve any perceived controversy between hypotheses that may not be mutually exclusive
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