Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 409899
Title Are Social Prediction Errors Universal? Predicting Compliance with a Direct Request across Cultures
Author(s) Bohns, V.K.; Handgraaf, M.J.J.; Sun, J.; Aaldering, H.; Mao, C.; Logg, J.
Source Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 47 (2011)3. - ISSN 0022-1031 - p. 676 - 680.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2011.01.001
Department(s) Economics of Consumers and Households Group
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) psychological-research - self - individualism - collectivism - conformity - seeking - support - harmony - help - ask
Abstract Previous research conducted in the United States has demonstrated that help-seekers fail to appreciate the embarrassment and awkwardness (i.e., social costs) targets would experience by saying “no” to a request for help. Underestimation of such social costs leads help-seekers to underestimate the likelihood that others will comply with their requests. We hypothesized that this error would be attenuated in a collectivistic culture. We conducted a naturalistic help-seeking study in the U.S. and China and found that Chinese help-seekers were more accurate than American help-seekers at predicting compliance. A supplementary scenario study in which we measured individual differences in collectivistic and individualistic orientations within a single culture provided converging evidence for the association between collectivism and expectations of compliance. In both cases, the association between collectivism (culturally defined or measured) and predicted compliance was mediated by participants' ratings of the social costs of saying “no”
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