Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 410423
Title Cadmium Accumulation in Small Mammals: Species Traits, Soil Properties, and Spatial Habitat Use
Author(s) Brink, N.W. van den; Lammertsma, D.R.; Dimmers, W.J.; Boerwinkel, M.C.
Source Environmental Science and Technology 45 (2011)17. - ISSN 0013-936X - p. 7497 - 7502.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es200872p
Department(s) CE - Molecular Ecology Ecotoxicology and Wildlife Management
CWC - Environmental Risk Assessment
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) mice apodemus-sylvaticus - heavy-metal concentrations - river floodplains - food-web - earthworms - lead - diet - bioaccumulation - stressors - pollution
Abstract In this study, the impact of species-specific spatial habitat use, diet preferences, and soil concentrations and properties on the accumulation of cadmium in small mammals was investigated. The results show that for the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), a mobile species with a large range in diet composition, accumulation of cadmium was not related to local soil concentrations or soil properties, but to diet preferences. For the common vole (Microtus arvalis), a nonmobile, specific feeding species, accumulation of cadmium was related to local soil concentrations or properties. For the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), a species with a smaller home range than the wood mouse but a broader diet spectrum than the common vole, both local soil properties and diet appeared to affect the cadmium accumulation in the kidneys. The results of this field study show that species-specific traits of small mammals are important determinants of accumulation of cadmium on a local scale. For site-specific assessment of risks of contaminants, such information is essential in order to understand exposure dynamics
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