Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 410746
Title Differentiation of nitrous oxide emission factors for agricultural soils
Author(s) Lesschen, J.P.; Velthof, G.L.; Vries, W. de; Kros, J.
Source Environmental Pollution 159 (2011)11. - ISSN 0269-7491 - p. 3215 - 3222.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2011.04.001
Department(s) SS - Soil Quality and Nutrients
SS - Soil Chemistry and Nature
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2011
Keyword(s) volatile fatty-acids - n2o emissions - cattle slurry - crop residues - fertilizer application - grassland soil - animal manures - gas emissions - water-content - barley field
Abstract Nitrous oxide (N2O) direct soil emissions from agriculture are often estimated using the default IPCC emission factor (EF) of 1%. However, a large variation in EFs exists due to differences in environment, crops and management. We developed an approach to determine N2O EFs that depend on N-input sources and environmental factors. The starting point of the method was a monitoring study in which an EF of 1% was found. The conditions of this experiment were set as the reference from which the effects of 16 sources of N input, three soil types, two land-use types and annual precipitation on the N2O EF were estimated. The derived EF inference scheme performed on average better than the default IPCC EF. The use of differentiated EFs, including different regional conditions, allows accounting for the effects of more mitigation measures and offers European countries a possibility to use a Tier 2 approach
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