Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 414209
Title Increased recruitment rates indicate recovering populations of the sea urchin Diadema antillarum on Curacao
Author(s) Vermeij, M.; Debrot, A.O.; Hal, N. van der; Bakker, J.; Bak, R.P.M.
Source Bulletin of Marine Science 86 (2010)3. - ISSN 0007-4977 - p. 719 - 725.
Department(s) IMARES Ecosystemen
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2010
Keyword(s) mass mortality - coral-reefs - tripneustes-ventricosus - netherlands-antilles - community structure - philippi - density - echinodermata - degradation - echinoidea
Abstract Recruitment of the sea urchin Diadema antillarum philippi, 1845 was studied on artificial recruitment panels along the leeward coast of the island of Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Data were compared with historical data from the same coast that were collected before (1982-1983) and after (1984) the Caribbean-wide mass mortality of Diadema in October 1983. Average recruitment rates observed in 2005 were equal to 2.2 times lower compared to those observed before the D. antillarum die-off (1982 and 1983), but 56.5 times higher than those observed after the die-off in 1984. The increase in recruitment rates between 1984 and 2005 was 5-51 times greater than the increase in abundance of adult individuals over the same period. This suggests that despite the largely recovered recruitment rates of this important reef herbivore, unknown sources of high post-settlement mortality currently prevent a similar recovery of its adult population
Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.